Medisoft (https://www.medisort.co.uk/) collects, processes and disposes of healthcare waste in the southeast of England, including single use instruments, sharps, medicinal waste and absorbent hygiene products. A significant proportion of these products are children’s nappies and adult incontinence products (categorised as offensive waste). Medisort aim to deliver a bespoke service which maximises segregation, ensures full compliance, delivers cost reduction and reduces environmental impact.

Innovation, investment and peer support

Our Brighton hub facilitated a successful proof of concept study followed by a Knowledge Transfer Partnership with the University of Brighton. This enabled Medisort to access academic expertise from our School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences to successfully develop waste treatment and material recovery processes for the development of novel products from the nappy waste stream. Medisort also accessed Profitnet, our academically developed peer-to-peer action learning programme and have received Investment Readiness coaching to enable commercialisation of the KTP results. This has enabled them to develop and secure investment for a dedicated nappy waste treatment and recovery facility.

 

Increased turnover and a new revenue stream

To date the KTP has carried out testing on using these waste products to recover soil damaged by heavy metals. It has also investigated the use of cleansed product in creating new materials. Over the coming months the project will enable the company to increase the amount of recyclable waste and improve the segregation route for materials, thus reducing costs associated with recycling and incineration. This will lead to increased turnover from new waste treatment and the material recovery process, as well as a new income stream from the launch of novel products.

 

A breakthrough moment

 “Discovery of the Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) was a breakthrough moment for Medisort.  I had been working with the University of Brighton for a few years already, but the KTP enabled me to bring research and continual learning to the business in a tangible, meaningful way.  This is in addition to the more obvious benefits derived from the innovative nappy recycling project that has been the focus of our work together. Engagement with the KTP has set a foundation, from which we will build a more scientific basis for quality control and product development.  The contacts made and disciplines learnt will stay with us forever. I plan to remain actively involved with the University, both by contributing as a critical friend to the Business School Advisory Board and participant in Profitnet, which also gives me opportunity to help other SMEs in this area and to develop collaboration possibilities”.

Stuart Brittle, Managing Director